March 21, 2012

New Pew Research Center Survey: More Americans See “Too Much” Religious Talk by Politicians

Washington, D.C. — A new national survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and the Pew Research Center’s Forum on Religion & Public Life finds signs of public uneasiness with the mixing of religion and politics. The number of people who say there has been too much religious talk by political leaders stands at an all-time high since the Pew Research Center began asking the question more than a decade ago. And most Americans continue to say that churches and other houses of worship should keep out of politics.

CONTACT

Mary Schultz
Communications Manager
202-419-4556
mschultz@pewforum.org 

Jemila Woodson
Communications Associate
202-419-4564
jwoodson@pewforum.org 

Nearly four-in-ten Americans (38%) now say there has been too much expression of religious faith and prayer from political leaders, while 30% say there has been too little. In 2010, more said there was too little than said there was too much religious expression from politicians (37% vs. 29%). The percentage saying there is too much expression of religious faith by politicians has increased across party lines, but this view remains far more widespread among Democrats than Republicans.

Slightly more than half of the public (54%) says that churches should keep out of politics, compared with 40% who say religious institutions should express their views on social and political matters. This is the third consecutive poll conducted over the past four years in which more people have said churches and other houses of worship should keep out of politics than said they should express their views on social and political topics. By contrast, between 1996 and 2006, the balance of opinion on this question consistently tilted in the opposite direction.

The survey, conducted March 7-11 among 1,503 adults, is available on the Pew Forum’s website.

###

The Pew Research Center’s Forum on Religion & Public Life conducts surveys, demographic analyses and other social science research on important aspects of religion and public life in the U.S. and around the world. As part of the Washington-based Pew Research Center, a nonpartisan, non-advocacy organization, the Pew Forum does not take positions on policy debates or any of the issues it covers. It is supported by The Pew Charitable Trusts.  

Twitter: @pewforum  

Facebook: facebook.com/pewforum