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InteractivesDecember 13, 2016

Educational Attainment of Religious Groups by Country

There are important differences in educational attainment among religious groups living in the same region — or even the same country.

Kelvin Leadismo (2nd L), 12, and his classmates attend a tuition class at Loltulelei primary school on July 16, 2013  in Kisima township of Kenya's nothern county of Samburu. The class is attended by young shepherds from the Samburu community who are usually unable to attend regular daytime classes when they are tending to their family's livestock at pasture. The school runs a parallel tuition programme to the national curriculum that enables the otherwise illeterate shepherds acquire literacy through the two to three hour tuition courses presided over by volunteer teachers.  AFP PHOTO / Tony KARUMBA        (Photo credit should read TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)
Polling and AnalysisDecember 13, 2016

How Religious Groups Differ in Educational Attainment

A new Pew Research Center global demographic study shows differences in educational attainment among the world’s major religious groups.

(Copyright Anek/Getty Images)
Demographic StudyDecember 13, 2016

Religion and Education Around the World

Jews are more highly educated than any other major religious group around the world, while Muslims and Hindus tend to have the fewest years of formal schooling. But all religious groups are making gains, particularly among women.

(Credit: Matthew Hertel via Getty Images)
Multi-section reportsOctober 26, 2016

One-in-Five U.S. Adults Were Raised in Interfaith Homes

Roughly one-in-five U.S. adults were raised with a mixed religious background, according to a new Pew Research Center study.

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Multi-section reportsJuly 13, 2016

Evangelicals Rally to Trump, Religious ‘Nones’ Back Clinton

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Multi-section reportsNovember 3, 2015

U.S. Public Becoming Less Religious

There has been a modest drop in overall rates of belief in God and participation in religious practices. But religiously affiliated Americans are as observant as before.

WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 24:  Pope Francis is applauded by members of Congress as he arrives to speak during a joint meeting of the U.S. Congress in the House Chamber of the U.S. Capitol on September 24, 2015 in Washington, DC. Pope Francis is the first pope to address a joint meeting of Congress and will finish his tour of Washington later today before traveling to New York City. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Polling and AnalysisOctober 7, 2015

Positive Impact of Pope Francis on Views of the Church, Especially Among Democrats and Liberals

Pope Francis has generated goodwill toward the Catholic Church among many Americans across the political spectrum. But Democrats and liberals are especially likely to say they have a more positive view of the Church because of Francis.

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Multi-section reportsSeptember 2, 2015

U.S. Catholics Open to Non-Traditional Families

When Pope Francis arrives in the U.S., he will find a Catholic public that is remarkably accepting of a variety of non-traditional families, according to a new survey on family life, sexuality and Catholic identity.

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Multi-section reportsJune 16, 2015

Catholics Divided Over Global Warming

A solid majority of U.S. Catholics believe that Earth is warming. But climate change is a highly politicized issue that sharply divides American Catholics, like the U.S. public as a whole, mainly along political party lines.

Demographic StudyMay 12, 2015

America’s Changing Religious Landscape

The Christian share of the U.S. population is declining, while the share of Americans who do not identify with any organized religion is growing. These changes affect all regions in the country and many demographic groups.